Friday, April 22, 2011

IMA's Material World examines the fabric of society

Norman Norell, 1956, by far my fave!
It can happen to anyone, getting all wrapped up in staring at the pretty dresses. The sequin-encrusted 1956 Norman Norell piece at the front of the Indianapolis Museum of Art's Material World exhibit for example, had me transfixed for a good six minutes, before the proximal pressure of the person craning their neck behind me reminded me I should move my fanny.

Each of one those sequins, including the united front of sparkle on the lining of the matching jacket, were sewn on by hand, in two directions to make sure they don't bend or curl. One can get so mesmerized by the patience and thought behind such a piece, one can forget she's there to learn about the vast universe of textiles.

Unlike the previous exhibit, Body Unbound, which was practically porn for fashion academics, Material World focuses more on what things are made of instead of how bloody pretty they are as a garment.

Scoll through a couple of my favorites below. Every piece pictured is part of the IMA's permanent collection. Pretty cool, right?
Pierre Balmain
Ball gown, 1953–1954
silk, metallic threads, pearls, sequins


Chanel

Halston



*all photos taken my moi :)
P.S. A pair of feathered shoes by local label, Eimaj Designs by Dampier, (pictured below) will be joining the collection within two weeks. Congrats Jamie!

1 comment:

  1. I pondered to myself recently what were the most important things in my life. The answer seems to be clear that art was up there in importance. Why? Frankly, I don't really know. May be someone here can enlighten me?
    As was my wont when I have some free time, I browsed the marvelous site, wahooart.com, where they keep thousands of digital images for customers to select to have printed into handsome canvas prints for their homes.
    This image jumped out to jolt my reveries: Still life with bread, by the Cubist Georges Braque. Is art like this picture, as essential as bread and water, or should I say bread and wine?

    ReplyDelete

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